March 2021 Coach's Quiz

We’ve explained the seven rules to follow to avoid—and help your leasing agents avoid—engaging in discriminatory steering. Let’s see how well you’ve learned the lesson. Take the Coach’s Quiz below to see if you can apply the rules to real-life situations. Each question has one and only one correct answer. On a separate piece of paper, write down the number of each question, and list the letter corresponding to the answer you believe is correct—for example, (1) b, (2) a, and so on. The correct answers (with explanations) follow the quiz.

We’ve explained the seven rules to follow to avoid—and help your leasing agents avoid—engaging in discriminatory steering. Let’s see how well you’ve learned the lesson. Take the Coach’s Quiz below to see if you can apply the rules to real-life situations. Each question has one and only one correct answer. On a separate piece of paper, write down the number of each question, and list the letter corresponding to the answer you believe is correct—for example, (1) b, (2) a, and so on. The correct answers (with explanations) follow the quiz. Good luck!

QUESTION #1

A prospect tells a leasing agent that he’s a devout Christian and wants to be shown only apartments where the neighboring occupants are also Christian. No Jews. No Muslims. Just Christians like me, he demands. What should the leasing agent do?  

a.            Agree to his demands because it’s not steering when the prospect is the one who discriminates.

b.            Tell him that the community is an equal housing opportunity provider and offer to show him units based purely on availability.

c.             Refer him to neighboring communities where he’d be comfortable because they have a large number of Christian residents.  

 

QUESTION #2

A married couple with an adorable 2-year-old child wants to lease an apartment as soon as possible. Unfortunately, the only apartment currently available is a 10th floor unit with an open balcony. The leasing agent is horrified and wants to protect the toddler. What should she do?

a.            Not tell the couple about the vacancy for their own safety.

b.            Tell the couple that the unit is vacant but strongly advise them not to take it.

c.             Tell the couple the unit is vacant but inform them that it has an open balcony.